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Electricity in Malaysia in 2023

Global Ranking: #117
19.5% #131 Low-carbon electricity
41.16 % #72 Electrification
631.98 watts #59 Generation / person
544.08 gCO2eq/kWh #157 Carbon Intensity

As of 2023, Malaysia's electricity consumption relies heavily on fossil fuels, accounting for a significant 80.5% of its total. More than half of this is generated from coal (43.13%) and a sizeable amount from gas (36.78%). In stark contrast, low-carbon or clean electricity sources constitute a smaller portion of the mix, with only 19.5% coming from sustainable means. Hydropower is the most substantial low-carbon source, contributing 17.15%, while solar energy accounts for a mere 1.73%. This reliance on fossil fuels is concerning due to the negative implications on climate change and air pollution.

Suggestions

To increase low-carbon electricity generation, Malaysia can learn from countries that have successfully diversified their energy mix. For instance, the extensive use of nuclear energy in France (65%) and Slovakia (62%) demonstrates how adopting nuclear power can dramatically reduce reliance on fossil fuels. Additionally, Denmark’s achievement with wind energy, providing 53% of its electricity, offers another viable path for Malaysia. Emulating these countries by investing in both nuclear and wind energy could lead Malaysia toward a more sustainable future. Encouraging private and public investment in these technologies, backed by policies favoring green energy, will be critical for reducing fossil fuel dependency.

History

The history of low-carbon electricity generation in Malaysia has seen various fluctuations, predominantly in hydropower. In the 1980s, there were moderate increments, such as an increase of 1.7 TWh in 1984 and 0.8 TWh in 1987. The 1990s witnessed both declines and gains with notable decreases like 1.3 TWh in 1990 and 1997, but also significant growth in 1999 with a 3.1 TWh increase. The 21st century brought more stability and growth, particularly from 2011 onwards, with considerable increases of 1.3 TWh in 2011, culminating in a major boost of 6.8 TWh in 2017. Solar energy also began to feature in recent years, with its initial increase noted in 2019 by 0.8 TWh. This historical analysis underscores the importance of consistent investment in low-carbon technologies to ensure sustainable growth.

Electricity Imports and Exports

Balance of Trade

Data Sources

For the years 1980 to 1984 the data sources are EIA and IEA (imports/exports).
For the year 1985 the data sources are Energy Institute and IEA (imports/exports).
For the year 1986 the data source is Energy Institute.
For the years 1987 to 1989 the data sources are Energy Institute and IEA (imports/exports).
For the years 1990 to 1992 the data sources are Energy Institute and IEA (imports/exports).
For the years 1993 to 1994 the data source is IEA.
For the years 1995 to 1996 the data sources are Energy Institute and IEA (imports/exports).
For the year 1997 the data source is IEA.
For the year 1998 the data sources are Energy Institute and IEA (imports/exports).
For the years 1999 to 2001 the data source is Energy Institute.
For the years 2002 to 2010 the data sources are Energy Institute and IEA (imports/exports).
For the years 2011 to 2013 the data source is IEA.
For the years 2014 to 2016 the data source is Ember.
For the year 2017 the data sources are Energy Institute and IEA (imports/exports).
For the years 2018 to 2019 the data sources are Energy Institute and IEA (imports/exports).
For the years 2020 to 2023 the data source is Ember.
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