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Electricity in Malaysia in 2022

Global Ranking: #74
19.0% #129 Low-carbon electricity
613.76 watts #60 Generation / person
543.14 gCO2eq/kWh #156 Carbon Intensity

As of 2022, Malaysia’s energy consumption is dominated by fossil fuels, contributing an estimated 81% to the nation’s power supply. This consists of approximately 42% coal and 38% gas. Low-carbon energies such as hydropower and solar power form a much lesser portion, making up just over 19% of the energy mix. Hydropower is the most significant low-carbon energy source with 17%, while solar energy barely tips the scale at slightly over 1%.

Suggestions

Given the global trend to reduce carbon emissions, there is a pressing need for Malaysia to shift to more low-carbon electricity sources. This could be informed by the success stories of other countries. For instance, France and Slovakia have exploited nuclear power to meet 66% and 61% of their electricity needs respectively. This could serve as a testament to the potential of nuclear power in contributing significantly to low-carbon electricity generation. Moreover, wind energy, as seen in Denmark and Uruguay, has shown significant promise, accounting for 59% and 41% of their electricity respectively. These viable low-carbon options could provide a blueprint for Malaysia, towards enhancing its energy security and environmental sustainability.

History

A glance at the historical records of Malaysia’s low-carbon electricity paints a picture predominantly characterised by hydropower. This started in the mid-1980s, with generation increasing marginally throughout the decade. A few fluctuations were witnessed in the 1990s, with production alternately rising and falling. However, the turn of the century saw a more consistent upward trend in hydropower generation. The growth in the subsequent decades, particularly the 2010s, was more significant, peaking at an increase of 6.8 TWh in 2017. Despite a slight dip in 2020, a vigorous rebound of 3.1 TWh was recorded in 2021.

Electricity Imports and Exports

Balance of Trade

Data Sources

For the years 1980 to 1984 the data sources are EIA and IEA (imports/exports).
For the year 1985 the data sources are Energy Institute and IEA (imports/exports).
For the year 1986 the data source is Energy Institute.
For the years 1987 to 1989 the data sources are Energy Institute and IEA (imports/exports).
For the years 1990 to 1992 the data sources are Energy Institute and IEA (imports/exports).
For the years 1993 to 1994 the data source is IEA.
For the years 1995 to 1996 the data sources are Energy Institute and IEA (imports/exports).
For the year 1997 the data source is IEA.
For the year 1998 the data sources are Energy Institute and IEA (imports/exports).
For the years 1999 to 2001 the data source is Energy Institute.
For the years 2002 to 2003 the data sources are Energy Institute and IEA (imports/exports).
For the year 2004 the data source is Ember.
For the years 2005 to 2010 the data sources are Energy Institute and IEA (imports/exports).
For the years 2011 to 2013 the data source is IEA.
For the years 2014 to 2016 the data source is Ember.
For the year 2017 the data sources are Energy Institute and IEA (imports/exports).
For the years 2018 to 2019 the data sources are Energy Institute and IEA (imports/exports).
For the years 2020 to 2022 the data source is Ember.
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