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Low-Carbon Power.org Blog

Where do our emissions numbers come from?

Dec 09, 2021
We show emissions from electricity generation with the unit gCO2eq/kWh in various places on this website. But what does it mean, and where does it come from? Read more.

Confronting climate change requires ambition

Nov 27, 2021
In my opinion, the most important reason why the Republic of China (Taiwan) has so successfully managed Covid is ambition. While there have been multiple outbreaks, the goal has always been crystal clear – to get back to 0 cases and eliminate the virus from the island. Unfortunately, when it comes to energy and climate change, this ambition is lacking. Read more.

Misleading claims about renewable power generation share in Denmark

Sep 08, 2021
A recent press release from GlobalData claims that, in Denmark, “the share of renewables in the generation mix is already quite high, at 86.4% as of 2020, and it is set to grow to 99.9% in 2030”. For decarbonization enthusiasts like me, this would be great news. Unfortunately, it’s both incorrect and misleading. Read more.

What can we learn about decarbonization from past experiences?

May 10, 2021
I have been developing this website for almost two years. It started out with my own curiosity of the state of decarbonization around the world. I wanted to know how much of our electricity comes from low-carbon sources, what it looks like in different countries and how it has and continues to develop over time. Apart from satisfying my own curiosity, this website aims to make decarbonization and electricity data more accessible to a broad public. I hope that this can contribute to a more rational and humble discussion of future energy policy. Read more.

Why are we not talking about hydropower?

Jan 21, 2021
One of the major rifts in the environmental movement concerns what technology we should prioritize to speed up decarbonization efforts. One side advocates renewables - usually exemplified by solar and wind power. The other side believes the solution is nuclear energy. The pro-renewables camp often points to the strong growth of solar and wind in recent years, accompanied by decreasing cost. They also emphasize the perceived risks of nuclear power. The pro-nuclear people point out that solar and wind power is intermittent, forcing continued reliance on fossil fuels - coal or gas - when the sun doesn't shine, while nuclear power delivers base load power all the time. As to the risks of nuclear, they argue that these have been exaggerated in popular perceptions while data shows nuclear to be one of the safest sources of electricity. Read more.

Blog

Dec 09, 2021
Where do our emissions numbers come from?

Nov 27, 2021
Confronting climate change requires ambition

Sep 08, 2021
Misleading claims about renewable power generation share in Denmark

May 10, 2021
What can we learn about decarbonization from past experiences?

Jan 21, 2021
Why are we not talking about hydropower?

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